Episode 29 - Red Carving

Tracklist

  • 01. Loscil - Red Tide
  • 02. Psychic Twin - Strangers
  • 03. Pional - Of My Mind
  • 04. Janelle Kroll - 24 Hrs
  • 05. Parts - Pieces
  • 06. Vandelux - Stimulus
  • 07. Lea Porcelain - Snowstorm
  • 08. Praything - Lonely Girl
  • 09. Tasseomancy - Claudine
  • 10. Bantug - Creatures
  • 11. The American Dollar - 4 Bc
  • 12. Fufanu - Bad Rockets
  • 13. Midnight Faces - Heavenly Bodies
  • 14. Diamondstein - The Carving

Artist Information

Loscil

Loscil is the electronic/ambient music project of Scott Morgan, from Vancouver, BC. The name Loscil is taken from the "looping oscillator" function (loscil) in Csound.

A self-released album titled A New Demonstration of Thermodynamic Tendencies caught the attention of experimental music label Kranky who signed Morgan on to release his first album Triple Point in 2001. Triple Point features six tracks off his first independent release as well as four new tracks.

Loscil followed up the release with Submers, an aquatic-themed album. Each track on the album is named after a submarine. The last track on the album was produced in honour of the people who died on the Russian submarine K-141 Kursk.

His 2004 album First Narrows (a reference to the official name of the Vancouver bridge, also known as Lions' Gate Bridge) marked the incorporation of improvised performances[1] by a number of guest musicians: Nyla Raney, cello; Tim Loewen, guitar; and Jason Zumpano, Rhodes piano. Consequently, the songs were more organic and looser in nature than his previous work which he performed alone.

Eight of his songs were featured on the film score of the 2004 documentary ScaredSacred by award-winning documentary filmmaker Velcrow Ripper.[2]

Stases is an album made up of background drones from his other albums. It was released for free on the website for the One record label.

The theme of his fourth album, released in 2006, continues the conceptual ascent each album has taken, from the sub-atomic level (Triple Point) and watery depths (Submers) to the surface (First Narrows) and the sky (Plume). Plume continues his musical integration of other musicians into his ambient compositions, including Josh August Lindstrom on vibes and xylophone and Krista Michelle Marshall and Stephen Michael Wood on ebow guitar (as well as Zumpano again on piano).

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Psychic Twin

In dreams, we rarely know what we are running from or toward. We only know we must keep running, continue searching. Psychic Twin’s debut album, Strange Diary, lives in that state of surreal urgency. What’s in front of us or behind us can’t be described, but we are sure in our bones that what we are searching for exists just a few steps away. These songs are “dreamlike” in a more fundamental sense than that overused descriptor implies. They reflect the emotionally arduous and unpredictable journey that singer, songwriter, and composer Erin Fein took to creating them.

The making of Strange Diary spans four years and two states. Fein began writing and composing solo material in Champaign-Urbana, Ill. amid the dissolution of her marriage. Following the divorce, she relocated to Brooklyn, N.Y. and continued to write and record-despite lineup changes and the lonely disorientation that comes from shedding an old life and starting over. The album contains songs written before, during, and after the divorce, from both New York and Illinois. The subject of each song is an unnamed “you,” who she alternately pleads with and flees from. “These songs are 100% a diary of my life over the last four years,” says Fein.

Today, Psychic Twin’s evolution includes drummer Rosana Caban and Fein’s absorption of several sources of inspiration. While rooted in the avant pop of The Cocteau Twins, Siousxie, and Annie Lennox, contemporary production flourishes lend each song the clarity and buoyancy of contemporary pop. The music balances languid, dark melodies and atmosphere with propulsive rhythms and soaring vocal lines. It’s beautiful and catchy. It’s like the sound of someone reaching the end of that dream, finding what they’ve been searching for through all the haze.

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Pional



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Janelle Kroll



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Parts



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Vandelux

He is making music. Because it is fun.

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Lea Porcelain

“The song is rich in vibrant synthesizers and gentle vocals laced with percussion as lively as a marching band, creating a track as quixotic as a lucid dream." - Stereogum

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Praything

Praything is Ju Kovacevich.

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Tasseomancy

Tasseomancy is the musical project of sisters Sari and Romy Lightman. Influenced by the likes of Robbie Basho, Broadcast, Mary Margaret O'hara, and Alice Coltrane's Turiya Sings, the band has developed a unique sound that combines the lyrical and vocal traditions of folk music with the experimental attitudes of psychedelia, new wave, and new age music. In 2011, they released 'Ulalume', a collaborative record with Timber Timbre, while also joining the electronic queer group, Austra. They've since left that band to focus on their own project, and in May 2015 are set to release 'Palm Wine Revisited'.

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Bantug



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The American Dollar



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Fufanu

Formerly operating as techno duo, Captain Fufanu, by adding more live instruments to their sound - the band name shortened to Fufanu. Their approach delivers a unique modern rock'n'roll sound rooted in new wave, post punk and indeed future rock. Realsing their debut album later in 2015 via One Little Indian Records, being one of 10 New Artist You Need to know by Rolling Stone Magazine and winning The Band To Watch in 2015 by Reykjavík Grapevine after gaining the trust of the audience.

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Midnight Faces

Fifty years from now, when polite self-driving cars move us comfortably from point A to point B at a top speed of 55mph, burning clean water vapor, not so much as a single rough patch of road under tires made of—oh, let’s say—recycled Greek yogurt cups, a group of vigilantes will take to the night. They’ll roll contraband Thunderbirds and Mustangs in neutral from their hiding spots, tanks full, window down. And they’ll find an open patch of highway outside of the city, free to gun the engines until they roar, the ancient smells of burning rubber and diesel filling the air. But the most important thing, the thing each driver obsesses over between every ride? The soundtrack, of course.

And Midnight Faces’ Heavenly Bodies will pour out of those windows and echo out into the dark.

If it seems a little melodramatic, what’s wrong with that? Midnight Faces makes music built for those moments when your heart’s beating faster, the moments when you’re willing to drop your worries for at least the length of an LP and just ride out on the feeling.

The third album from duo Matthew Doty (guitar/bass/synth) and Phil Stancil (vocals/guitar/bass), Heavenly Bodies is the first to feature drummer Paul Doyle as a full-fledged collaborator and the thrilling expansion of a sound begun on 2013’s Fornication. For that album, Midnight Faces’ debut, Stancil brought vocals to Doty’s existing songs; 2014’s The Fire Is Gone saw a more thorough partnership emerge between the two musicians, and praise for the record flowed from outlets including SPIN, Entertainment Weekly, VICE, and Nylon. And now, Midnight Faces returns with a more evocative sound than ever. From the widescreen guitars of opener “Blue Haze,” to the delectable electronic textures of “Space Boy,” to the twilight rush of “Feeling Like a Stranger,” the songs of Heavenly Bodies feel like breath in the lungs, ready to carry you forward wherever you want to go.

Doty and Stancil met in Grand Rapids, MI, though both were initially involved in separate projects. Doty had gained attention in the early 2000s with his band Saxon Shore, co-founded with his friend Josh Tillman, now better known as Father John Misty. Later, he’d catch Stancil singing during a gig at a bar. When they began playing together, Stancil says, it was a smooth transition, if a bit outside of his comfort zone. Stancil’s voice, rich and warm, sounds lifted from the golden age of ’70s and early ’80s classic rock, while Doty’s compositions tended toward a sound more reminiscent of dream-pop, shoegaze, and post-punk’s skittering energy. “I’d never written music from that standpoint,” Stancil explains, “and stylistically it was different, but it all came together pretty quickly for us.”
The synchronicity shows: Stancil’s voice lends weight to Doty’s emotive, atmospheric songs, while Doty’s precise, layered songwriting lets Stancil’s vocals float to the top of the mix, driving these indie-minded tracks with the directness of strongly melodic, instantly memorable classic rock. Together, with Doyle’s steady percussion, the songs of Heavenly Bodies take on a yearning, nostalgic—but never despairing—quality. It’s as if you’d been humming them to yourself in a montage of your memories, only realizing it when the song ends. Luckily, you can start over again with Heavenly Bodies whenever the moment takes you, which, with a band as graceful and immediate as Midnight Faces, it’s sure to do over and over again.

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Diamondstein

Diamondstein is Audio Visual.

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